Crossing the no-downtime chasm - part 1 - Migrations

Often the business knows before engineers do that the organization has passed the point of there being no acceptable amount of planned down time.

It’s not an event in a SaaS companies lifetime that’s marked with a lot of fanfare - but as an engineer it’s incredibly significant - you know when you’ve moved past it because suddenly things become a lot more complicated. Things are HARD. Lots of your skills to date are not transferable to this new world.

It’s often not until you experience severe unexpected down time that the tolerance of the business for such down time is established/tested, often the last time you had significant unplanned down-time is the pre-cursor to the business making the decision (often at the board level) to no longer tolerate planned down time - even though planned and unplanned are not the same thing, to the business (and it’s customers) the impact is much the same.

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Upgrading .net core 1.1 to 2.0 for docker users

For my latest feature we have been working on a microservice running across 4 docker containers.

All the containers are running on a runtime base image we build for .net core 1.1 - which has been working really well.

We are now starting the process of upgrading to .net core 2.0 (2.0.3)…

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The story so far


My Name is Alex Henderson and as I write this I’m a 38 year old software developer, who has been working professionally since 1999. As I begin blogging again I thought this was a good opportunity to report on my personal story as a engineer so far.

So here it is!

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